Dry Needling

 

From Wikipedia, “In the treatment of trigger points for persons with myofascial pain syndrome, dry needling is an invasive procedure in which a needle, often an acupuncture needle, is inserted into the skin and muscle directly at a myofascial trigger point. A myofascial trigger point consists of multiple contraction knots, which are related to the production and maintenance of the pain cycle. Deep dry needling for treating trigger points was first introduced by Czech physician Karel Lewit in 1979 Lewit had noticed that the success of injections into trigger points in relieving pain was apparently unconnected to the analgesic used Proper dry needling of a myofascial trigger point will elicit a local twitch response (LTR), which is an involuntary spinal cord reflex in which the muscle fibers in the taut band of muscle contract. The LTR indicates the proper placement of the needle in a trigger point. Dry needling that elicits LTRs improves treatment outcomes, and may work by activating endogenous opioids Inserting the needle can itself cause considerable pain No study to date has reported the reliability of trigger point diagnosis and physical diagnosis cannot be recommended as a reliable test for the diagnosis of trigger points Chan Gunn introduced a type of dry needling called intramuscular stimulation in the 1980s that moved away from using trigger points. Baldry developed a version called superficial dry needling in 2005, in which the needle is inserted about 5-10mm into the tissue above the trigger point”